Prolong The Life of Fresh Vegetables

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I saw something about this on the TV and of course I had to experiment.
First, I tried with Romaine Lettuce and prolonged the usability and crunchiness to a little over a week.

My second try was with carrots. I was fed-up with carrots going limp and buying just 2-3 carrots was too expensive – bearing in mind the cost of driving to a shop every 2nd day and missing out on multi buy that ‘s cheaper. This time I managed to extend the usability to nearly 2 weeks, then I ran out of carrots.

While starting experiment one and two I also started the third one, this time using tomatoes. Because tomatoes are sold in punnets and if you like me only eat one or two every 2nd day, they go limp and over ripens before one has a chance to even eat half the punnet. I managed to keep eatable tomatoes for four weeks (see picture. Yes, they are 4 weeks after purchase old).

What’s the secret, you may ask.
Simple, you must, when you get home from shopping instead of loading your fridge with your purchase repack everything as follows:

  • Remove the plastic bags and wrappings.
  • Check that everything is usable,
    don’t bin unusable vegetables because some of it is still usable.
  • Dampen (soak it in water, and wring it as much as you can) a tea towel and use this to wrap the vegetables – each kind in a separate towel.
  • Store/keep either in the Veg box or on the lower shelf.

I have also used this method on Oranges and Lemons, it works great, but here instead of the tea towel I used damped kitchen towel. PS. You must keep an eye on these.

And that’s the whole secret.

Cooking with a Digital Air Fryer

I purchased one of these at the Bedford auction a week or so ago. It only cost me £26 and I’m quite happy. I pulled myself together and decided that I would try it.

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Last Saturday, I was invited by Gesine to her birthday lunch in a very nice pub and I had roast belly pork; the most gorgeous belly pork I have had for a long, long time the meat was tender and not over cooked but the crackling was absolute perfect nearly as good as in Denmark and I definitely could not fault it.

I bought a piece of pork that looked as if it had some nice crackling and I also bought a large sweet potato, as there was a recipe in the downloaded recipe book for “Sweet Potato Fries”.

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Here are the two pictures of the pork joint. Apart from getting the timing slightly wrong by 5-10 minutes the Pork was great and the crackling even better. I was though surprised of how much liquid there was in the basket, as I had not added any.

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The sweet potatoes only took 15 minutes and again a great success. Crunchy on the outside and soft in the middle.

Now comes the cleaning of the basket/drawer, I have poured 1 pint hot water and detergent into the basked soaking both the raised platform and the lower plate. I am hoping that this will enable me to clean the basket correctly.

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Meatballs, Polpette and Rissole defined.

When looking for the definition of Polpette I came across these two descriptions:
Meatballs or Rissole.

A Meatball is ground meat rolled into a small ball, sometimes along with other ingredients, such as bread crumbs, minced onion, eggs, butter, and seasoning. Meatballs are cooked by frying, baking, steaming, or braising in sauce. There are many types of meatballs using different types of meats and spices.

A Rissole is a small patty enclosed in pastry, or rolled in breadcrumbs, usually baked or deep fried. The filling has savoury ingredients, most often minced meat, fish or cheese, and is served as an entrée, main course, or side dish.

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“Pork bola bola” soup, a simple yet delicious Filipino soup. Meatballs on a Skewer.
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Meatballs being Cooked Danish Meatballs (Frikadeller)
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Swedish style Meatballs, served with all the trimmings. Italian Polpette in Tomato sauce with Spaghetti.

Meatballs are cooked by frying, baking, steaming, or braising in sauce and/or soup. There are many types of meatballs using different types of meats and spices.
The term is sometimes extended to meatless versions based on vegetables (Vegiballs) or fish (Fishballs). You can also use Chicken or Turkey mince.

Retrieve a teaspoon full of the mince mixture (dough) and place it in the palm of your hand. Gently form that dough (by using your other hand as well) into a small ball (about 2cm in diameter). Place each ball on a tray, but keep them separate. Repeat until all the dough is used. Be careful not to overwork the dough, to avoid making your meatballs dense and tough, but the meatballs do need to be formed tightly enough that they won’t fall apart during cooking. You’ll get the hang of it after trying it once.

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PS… Wet your hands (between each ball) so that the dough doesn’t stick, and this also makes it easier to shape the individual balls.

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Two Dozen Courgette Recipes

I have just put the final touches to my fourth food booklet and would like to share it with you.
I am NOT going to self-publish unless I get inundated with requests.

This 28 page booklet contains, as the title states, twenty-four
varied recipes of what can be done with courgettes.
The recipes vary from salads, deep frying, pan frying, baking, stuffing, stewing to bread and cakes.
It can even be used as a pasta substitute.

Click here to order your Booklet

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