Cooking with a Digital Air Fryer

I purchased one of these at the Bedford auction a week or so ago. It only cost me £26 and I’m quite happy. I pulled myself together and decided that I would try it.

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Last Saturday, I was invited by Gesine to her birthday lunch in a very nice pub and I had roast belly pork; the most gorgeous belly pork I have had for a long, long time the meat was tender and not over cooked but the crackling was absolute perfect nearly as good as in Denmark and I definitely could not fault it.

I bought a piece of pork that looked as if it had some nice crackling and I also bought a large sweet potato, as there was a recipe in the downloaded recipe book for “Sweet Potato Fries”.

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Here are the two pictures of the pork joint. Apart from getting the timing slightly wrong by 5-10 minutes the Pork was great and the crackling even better. I was though surprised of how much liquid there was in the basket, as I had not added any.

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The sweet potatoes only took 15 minutes and again a great success. Crunchy on the outside and soft in the middle.

Now comes the cleaning of the basket/drawer, I have poured 1 pint hot water and detergent into the basked soaking both the raised platform and the lower plate. I am hoping that this will enable me to clean the basket correctly.

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About Chopped/Sliced/Diced Onions

I was watching the Hairy Biker in USA one morning while eating my breakfast.
One of their tips was to place the cut/chopped onions in ice water, to make them less potent.

I hadn’t heard that one before, so I Googled it and yes that’s a fact.

  • Is there a way to tame the raw onions bite as they seem to be everywhere especially in summer and salads?
  • There is, and it’s simple: soak them for 30 minutes in cold water.
  • How long can I keep raw onions?
  • Sliced, cut or diced raw onions can be stored in the fridge for up to 10 days.
    Simply wrap them tightly in plastic wrap or keep them in a resealable bag.

About the common Onion

  • The abrasive quality in onions comes from the sulphur compounds, which are neutralized when onions are heated. But water can have a similar effect as it dissipates many of the compounds, and thus reduces their pungency. Just leave the onions in the water for ten or so minutes, and you’ll have remarkably less intense onions. You can also soak them in vinegar or citrus juice to add a new flavour to the onions.

Coat Them in Salt

  • For those that don’t want the crispiness of water-soaked onions, salting them can eliminate some of the sting while also giving them a softer texture. Simply coat cut onions in a generous pinch of salt, and let them sit for 15 minutes; this will draw out much of the moisture, and some of the compounds that result in the pungency. Afterward, you can wipe/shake off the excess salt if you desire.
  • This is also my tip for dynamic salad dressings; salt some chopped shallots, as the moisture will infuse the dressing with a mild onion flavour.

Add Vinegar or Water & Microwave

  • If you don’t want to wait the 10-15 minutes for the other tricks, this is the quickest route: put the chopped onions in a bowl with some water or vinegar, add some salt, and throw them in the microwave for ten seconds. Voilà!
  • For a compromise between raw and cooked, one advice is to cook the chopped/sliced/diced onions in water on the stove for a minute or two on high heat, which will eliminate the intensity while retaining the raw texture.

And if you simply don’t like onions, don’t worry:
there are plenty of alternatives, but I’m not covering that topic.

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